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Full text of "Facts for the settler about the Lethbridge district, sunny southern Alberta, Canada"

Purchased 
from the 
Chancellor 
Richardson 
Memorial 
Fund 



CAKIAC)1AKIA 

coLLecnoM 
crueew s 

UMIVGRSITV 
ATklMQSTON 



The EDITH and LORNE PIERCE 
COLLECTION of CANADIANA 




^eens University at Kingston 



Facts for the Settler 

about the 

LETHBRIDGE DISTRICT 

Sunny Southern Alberta 

Canada 




I^ethbridge, Alta.. April ISth/igiO 

This pamphlet is issued by the I,ethbrids:e Board of Trade, 
the purpose being to tell the TRUTH about the l,ethbridge 
District of Sunny Southern Alberta. 

The TRUTH is good enough, and we fear the man who 
exaggerates, more than we do the knocker. 

Every statement in this pamphlet is guaranteed to be 
the truth without exaggeration. 

LETHBRIDGE BOARD OF TRADE, 



Secretary. 



DAILY 
HERALD 
PRESSES 



Lethbridge, 
ALTA., - Can. 




3 



There is today no place in the West where farming of all kinds can be 
carried on with more profit, for the capital and work invested, than in this 
distriot. 

Here there is a large irrigafcion system owned and operated by the Alberta 
Railway and Irrigation Co., ithis however does not mean tha/t irrigation is 
necessary for successful farming. 

Farming without irrigaition or dry farming as it ds called to distinguish it 
from irrigated, is the back bone of the distriot. 

Of the 276,400 acres in wheat, oats and barley in the district last year 
only some 30,000 was on irrigated land, the balance of 246,400 acres bedng on 
dry land, without irrigation. 

Such crops as Alfalfa, Timothy, Sugar Beets, Small Fruits and Market 
Gardens will, however, give a larger yield with irrigation making it very profit- 
able to use for these crops. 

THE GRAIN CROP 

Southern Alberta is noted as a Wheat District, and especially as a winter 
wheat district, being the home of the celebrated Alberta Red Winter Wheat. 
Other grains can be grown here to advantage, but it is sometimes said that 
the farmers here are wheat crazy and other grains are not given a fair show 
being usually put in because the farmer thinks when he gets ready to sow it Is 
too late to sow wheat. 



The Government Crop Report for the district (Crop Districts 1-2-3-4-5) is 
as follows for the year 1909: 





Acres 


B,ushels 


Average 




147,241 


2,740,045 


18.60 




58,923 


1,524,902 


25.87 


Oats 


67,271 


2,450,071 


36.44 




2,974 


83,559 


28.09 




276,409 


6,798,577 





The above are the averages for all, the good, bad and indifferent, and 
there are many who did better than tbe general average and some who did 
not do as well. 



60 bushels of wheat and 125 of oats are yields that a few men got, there 
were a great many who got 35 to 40 of wheat and 60 to 80 of oats and there 
is nothing to hinder any man doing as well as the best of these as it is not 
a matter of luck, but of careful intelligent farming. 

There is no difficulty about the proper method to follow in order to secure 
the best results and Mr. Fairfield of the Experimental Farm, writes as follows 
regarding it : 



5 



PREPARATION OF RAW LAND FOR THE FIRST CROP OF GRAIN 

"Break the ground during the wet season of May and June and roll it down 
flat immediately after the plow, this connects the furrow slice soil with the 
Bub-soil and facilitates the rotting process. 

"The common practice is to break 4 to 5 inches deep, further cultivation 
should be shallow. No attempt should be made to cut through the sod with 
(the discs but merely enough to form a muilch on top of the sod to prevent rapid 
evaporation. If one is prepared to do this surface cultivation after a rain while 
the sod is moist, the 'land will work more economically and to better advan- 
tage. Enough work should be done to get sufficient loose soil to fill in the 
cracks between the sods. 

"If this is done the sod will rot sufficiently during the summer to he 
loose and dn good condition for growing a crop the foillowing Spring. 

"If Winter wheat is to be sown, the best time to put it in is during the 
month of August, hnt if spring grain is to be sown, the land is allowed to 
lie in this condition till the following April when a good harrowing imme- 
dia/tely after the frost draws out will prepare the land sufficiently for the 
seed drill. For best resuiLts from Spring grain the land should be given the 
same surface preparation in July as if Winter wheat was to be sown. 

"Backsetting, although not commonly in vogue, is a practice that cannot be 
too highly recommended. The only change necessary in breaking is that It 
should be done shallower, 2 1-2 inches if possible. 

"The sods are rolled down and in the latter part of July the land is plowed 
again about two inches deeper than it was broken or as deep as the root fiber 
has rotted in the sub-soiil which is usually about two inches, the land is im- 
m diately harrowed after this plowing or if necessary harrowed and disced. 

"Considerable land during the past few years has been broken in April 
and immediately sown with grain. Although fair results are often obtained 
in this way, it is not a practice that can be recommended, for if the season is dry 
the resulting crop may be disappointing, and on account of the sods not having 
had a chance to rot properly, the second crop is not nearly as good as after 
breaking the land in May or June and allowing to lie fallow all summer. 

"The best amount of seed to sow per acre in this district has not yet been 
fully determined, however, about 60 lbs, of Winter wheat and about 70 of 
Spring wheat, oats or barley is probably not far from the right amount." 
COST OF OBTAINING THE FIRST CROP 

The cost of obtaining the first crop is a question in which new settlers are 
always interested and was about as follows, per acre, when let by contract 
last year: 

The farmer does not need to pay this out, however, as he can do a large 
amount of the work himself, and the second crop will not cost as much as 
the first, as a common practice is to put the second crop in the stubble with a 
disc seeder without plowing. 



Breaking new land $3.50 

Double discing 75 

Double harrowing 50 

Seed 1.25 

Seeding 50 

Cutting and stooking 1.25 

Twine 50 

Threshing from stook (30 bush.) 2.70 



Total, per acre $10.95 , 



AVERAGE PRICE OF GRAIN 

The average price of grain at the elevators here the past season has been 
as follows per bushel: Wheat 85 cents; barley 40 cents and oats 28 cents, which 
figuring only the average yield gives a good profit on the first crop and a 
larger one on the second. 

ALFALFA 

Alfalfa, undoubtedly the best forage plant known to modern farming. Is 
grown here most successfully. 

On irrigated land 3 to 6 tons per acre and on dry land 2 to 4 tons per acre 
are average crops per year and this when baled sells for $12 to $14 per ton. 

Soil for inoculation can be obtained from the Experimental farm without 
charge. 

Mr. Fairfield of the Experimental Farm in his pamphlet "Alfalfa Growing 
in Southern Alberta" concludes as follows: 

"Use summer fallow or land in which root crops have been grown the 
previous season. Do not plow it but prepare a shallow seed bed. Inoculaite 
the land with about 150 pounds of soil from an old alfalfa field and work it In 
while the seed bed is being prepared. Sow the seed in the latter part of 
May or early in June at the rate of 20 pounds per acre on irrigated land and 
less on dry land. 

"Do not use a nurse crop. 

"The first season do not neglect to run the mowing machine over 
the land before the weeds get too high and cut it a second time if practicable." 

SUGAR BEETS 

"Eighteen miles to the south of Lethbridge at Raymond is a large Beet 
Sugar Factory. 

Beets can be raised on new land if after breaking it up from the sod a 
crop of grain is raised and then summer fallowed for one year. 

One man can take care of about 15 acres and help can be obtained to 
take care of more. 

On dry land the crop averages 8 to 10 tons per acre and on irrigated land 
has gone as high as 22 tons per acre. 

It costs about $26.00 to raise a crop of 10 tons to the acre, a larger ton- 
nage costing a little more, and the factory pays $5.00 per ton for the beets at 
the factory. 



9 



SMALL FRUITS 

All kinds of Small Fruits grow here to perfection. Raspberries, Straw- 
berries, Currants, etc., all do well and are paying propositions either on a 
large scale or in the kitchen garden. 

Mr. H. P. Gatrell had six acres in strawberries and raspberries in 1909 
and this year is increasing it /to 12 acres. 

He is situated three miles from Lethbriidge and writes as follows: 

"This portion of Southern Alberta is eminently adapted for the growing 
of small fruit, particularly raspberries and strawberries. 

"When its capabilities in this respect are more thoroughly appreciated it 
will be 'the principal strawberry growing district in Western Canada not 
excepting the famous B. C. fruit lands. 




Picking Strawberries on Mr. Gatrell's Farm 

"Strawberries grown here and shown at the Dominion Fair in Calgary in 
1908 were pronounced by all who saw them to surpass any others in the ex- 
hibition both in appearance and flavor. 

I have been growing both berries for the market here for three years 
and am more satisfied each year and this year am doubling the acreage. 

"There is a splendid market for all the fruit that can be raised and prices 
are excellent, strav/berries averaged last year $3.40 per crate of 24 quarts 
wholesale and retailed at $4.25 per crate. At the same time imported berries 
were selling at $3.25 to $3.50 retail. Raspberries sold for about $2.70 per 
crate of 24 pints wholesale. 



11 



"The strawberry plants when set out will bear well for two years and 
taking one year with another the expense will be about ?60 per acre and pick- 
ing wiU cost two cents per quart. 

"With care and attention a man can easily realize a profit of $300 to $500 
per acre per year. 

"I am working on irrigaited land but if a deep rooted variety be selected 
and planted early in the Spring just before our heavy rains in May and the 
ground kept thoroughly cultivated to hold the moisture, berries will do well 
on dry land. 

"A farmer a few miles north of Lethbridge to whom I supplied plaMs has 
an excellent stand of both berries and had an abundant supply of fruit last 
yeiar on dry land, and our rainfall last year was less than the average." 

MARKET GARDENS 

Most, if not all of the Market Gardens here are on irnigated land as the 
returns from the garden will be larger 'than without irrigation and in fact most 
market gardens with which we are familiar in other districts have some 
means of putting on water artificially. 

All kinds of vegetables such as corn, lettuce, peas, cabbage, cauliflower, 
cucumbers, celery and all roots grow here to perfection and there is a much 
larger local demand for them than the local supply, large quantities being 
shipped in from a distance. 

With the long bright sunny days and plenty of water from the ditch, there 
is an excellent chance for the practical gardner who is willing to work. 

KITCHEN GARDENS 

Any farmer with a little energy can have a kitchen garden which will 
supply his table with all kinds of fresh vegetables in their season, stock his 
cellar with them for the winter, and have a surplus which can be sold for more 
than the cost of running the garden. 

DAIRY FARMING 

Dairy and milk farms are profitable undertakings in this district, the mild 
winters robbing them of much of the hard work that usually goes with them. 

Good feed is plentful, and there are very few days in winter when milch 
cows cannot be turned out to feed from the stack. 

Milk delivered at the house in Lethbridge sells for 10 cents per quart and 
good table butter at from 30 to 40 cents per pound. 

POULTRY FARMING 

Mr. Cook, of the Eden Rest Poultry Farm, Lethbridge, writes as follows: 
"Poultry keeping in connection with the farm or as a special business in 

Southern Alberta can be made very profitable If reasonable care be given the 

fowls. 



13 

"Poultry of almost every kind is easily raised here and owing to the 
greater length of daylight in summer, the young can be brought to maturity 
much more rapidly than in the east. 

"In the matter of housing, our climate is such that the fowls do better 
living as near the open as possible, yet having protection from the cold 
nights. Houses built on ithe open front plan are best and cheapest. The best 
ones are just large enough for 50 hens and the material for one costs $27.00 
in Lethbridge. 

"Situated on the main line of railway connecting us with the mining and 
lumber industries of British Columbia, we shall always have a good market 
for surplus eggs and poultry. At . present the local demand exceeds the 
supply and large q^uanti'ties are imported into the district each year. 

"In 1909 eggs retailed at the following prices: March and April, 35 cents 
per dozen; May, 25 cents; June and July, 30 cents; August and September.. 
40 cents; October and November, 45 cents; December, 50 cents; January, 
1910, 60 cents; February -50 cents. 

"During the past four years good dressed fowls have never retailed for 
less than 20 cents per pound, spring chickens from the time they are ready 
up to the middle of November 25 cents per pound, dressed, but not drawn. 
Turkeys with the head and feet on and not drawn sell for 25 to 32 cents per 
pound. 

"Taking into consideration how cheaply feed can be produced and the 
high prices eggs and poultry sell for we feeil satisfied there is no place in 
any country where Poultry Farming can be carried on more pleasantly and 
profitably than in Southern Alberta." 

RAIM FALL AT LETHBRIDGE FOR EIGHT YEARS 

Taken from the Government reports 





1902 


, 1903 


1904 


1905 


1906 


1907 


1908 


1909 


Av. 


January 





.67 





.62 





.50 


1 


.45 





.22 


1 


.52 





.27 





.49 




.72 


February 


1 


.03 





.79 





.90 





.05 





.20 





.30 





.75 





.28 




.54 


March 


0, 


.48 


0, 


,89 


1, 


.03 


0, 


.74 





.54 


0. 


.34 


1, 


.10 


0, 


.37 




.69 







.01 


0, 


.33 





.41 





.56 


1 


.30 


1 


.08 





.67 


1 


.51 




.73 




11, 


.27 


2. 


.95 


2, 


.86 


1, 


.33 


8 


.60 


1, 


.14 


2, 


.78 


4 


.27 


4 


.40 






68 


1 


.12 


1 


.80 


2 


.68 


2 


.31 


3 


.64 


7 


.64 


0, 


.62 


3 


.19 


July 


5 


.95 


1, 


.86 





.96 


1 


.44 





.83 


1 . 


43 


0. 


41 


1. 


94 


1, 


.85 


August 


0. 


.69 


3. 


,21 


1. 


,19 


1, 


.99 


4, 


.70 


2, 


.30 


0, 


.89 


0, 


.21 


1 


.90 


September .... 


0, 


;84 


1. 


,60 


0. 


,52 


0, 


,80 


0, 


,16 


3. 


24 


0. 


,73 


0, 


,49 


1 


.05 


October 


0. 


,02 


0. 


18 


0. 


85 


1. 


13 


1. 


,93 


0. 


05 


1. 


16 


0. 


,40 




.71 




0. 


43 


0. 


58 


0. 


03 


1. 


36 


0. 


,81 


0. 


14 


0. 


02 


0. 


53 




.49 


December 


0. 


84 


0. 


70 


0. 


35 


0. 


25 


0. 


88 


0. 


32 


0. 


25 


0. 


54 




.51 




27. 


91 


14. 


83 


11. 


40 


13. 


78 


22. 


48 


15. 


50 


16. 


67 


11. 


65 


16, 


.78 



AVERAGE PER YEAR FOR THE PAST EIGHT YEARS 16.78 INCHES 



15 



This yearly average however is not a true indlcaition of the rain as it af- 
fects the growing crop and an examination of the figures will show that for 
the eight years the average for the month of May is 4.4 inches, for June 3.19 
inches and for July 1.85 inches. 

That is, the yearly average for the months when the crop is growing is 
9.44 inches and this amount of rain fall at th-at time insures a first class crop. 

WEATHER 

Lethbridge is situated directly east of the Crows Nest Pass in the Rocky 
Mountains and through this pass gets the Chinook winds which give it a 
mild and fine winter; there is very little sleighing, when the snow falls the 
Chinook soon eats it up 

Fall and winter are a succession of bright sunny days with very little 
cold weather or storm 

Owing to the influence of the chinook the crop season opens earlier in the 
spring and frost holds off longer in the fall than in districts immediately 
south or north of Lethbridge.. Plowing usually continues through November; 
and this spring (1910) began the first week in March. 

SUNSHINE 

The following table showing the amount of sunshine enjoyed for the past 
two years will explain why this district is called SUNNY Southern Alberta: 

The instrument which records the sunshine does not make a record ex- 
cept for BRIGHT sun, neither does it make a record for about the first hour and 
a half the sun is up in the morning, nor for the last hour before it sets at 
night, as it is not bright enough then, therefore at least two hours can be 
added to the table for each day. 

No. of hrs. Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May Jun. Jly, Aug. Sep. Oct. Nov. Dec. Tl. 
sun above hor'n. 267 280 370 414 480 487 491 441 378 337 270 252 4467 
Reg. hrs. 1908 115 100 151 202 185 254 360 309 217 151 124 143 2311 
Reg. hrs. 1909 120 123 194 231 231 302 346 379 241 186 89 102 2544 

TAXES 

Taxes are very small on farm property, in districts where there is no 
school from $4 to $10 per quarter section, and where there is a school from 
16 to ?16, and cannot by law exceed $16 per quarter. 

ROADS AND BRIDGES 

The government takes care of the main roads and bridges and the roads 
are uniformly good with few or no hills. 

Automobiles run the year round on them at a rate of 25 miles per hour 
without any difficulty, and a farmer with four light horses often brings 100 
bushels of wheat 15 miles or more to the elevator. 



Lethbridge Exhibit, National Corn Exposition, Omaha, Nebraska— December 6-18, 1909. 



17 



SCHOOLS 

A provincial university has been established at Strathcona and a Normal 
school for the training of teachers at Calgary and there are several high 
schools, one of whdch is at Lethbridge, and public schools are in abundance all 
over the province. 

New schools can be easily obtained, any area not more than five miles in 
length or breadth having four actual residents who would be liable to assess- 
ment may be organized into a school district, provided there are in the 
district 12 children between the age of 5 and 16 years inclusive. 

This school district can issue debentures for the purpose of raising money 
to build a school house, the payment of which forms the basis of the school 
tax on the land in the district. 

The cost of maintaining the school is small as the government makes a 
liberal grant towards the teacher's salary, and also inspects the school twice a 
year to see that it ds kept up to the the proper standard. 

FUEL 

There arc five large coal mines at Lethbridge where the farmer can buy 
coal at $3.60 per ton. There are also a number of small mines scattered 
about the dis'trict where the farmer can buy coal for $2.50 to $3.00 per ton. 

EXPERIMENTAL FARM 

A great advantage to all farmers in the district is the Government Experi- 
mental Farm situated two miles from Lethbridge, and in charge of one of the 
best known agricultural authorities in the West, Mr. W. H. Fairfield. 

Here the farmer can obtain advice and information that can be depended 
on to be strictly correct and which it would take the individual farmer years 
of toil and loss to learn for himself. 

This is an important feature in this district, as its value, especially to 
the new settler, cannot be over estimated. 

LAW AND ORDER 

The Canadian laws are fair and just, and are enforced without fear or 
favor. The Mounted Police, the headquarters of a detachment being at 
Lethbridge, cover the country thoroughly and the bad man of the wild and 
wooly west is unknown here. 

Cattle stealing and other crimes often supposed to belong with the West 
are rarely heard of here, and life and property are as safe as on any farm in 
the East. 

PRICES AND TERMS FOR LAND 

In the district there is no railroad or government land for sale, but private 
Individuals and land companies, of which there are a number in Lethbridge, 
have plenty of land for sale. 



19 



Prices vary according to the owner and the location of the land. Land 
about 25 miles from the railroad sells for $14 to $18; fifteen miles from the rail 
the price will be about $18 to $20; seven or eight miles from the raid, $20 to 
$25, and still nearer the rail $25 up, this all being good wheat land. 

Irrigated land sells for $50 up. 

The actual settler who will go onto the land and improve it by putting 
in a crop can buy on easy terms and in many cases on crop payments. 



Land titles are issued by the Government on the Torrens system, and a 
person holding the Government certificate of title has absolute possession 
and no trouble to fear from former owners, or any one else. 

PRICES OF AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS 

The following is an average price for the following articles at Leth- 
bridge: 

3 1-4 Farm wagon complete, with brake $100.00 

20 Marker single disc drill 140.00 

8 ft. Binder with tongue truck 180.00 

5 ft. Mower 64.00 

12 ft. Self dump rake 40.00 

Combination stubble and breaker walking plow 29.00 

14 in. Sulky plow 50.00 

14 in. Gang plow 75.00 

10 Bottom big engine gang 830.00 

8 Bottom big engine gang 715.00 

20 Horsepower gas tractor 2350.00 

16116 Disc harrow complete with tongue truck 55.00 

60 Tooth drag, complete with draw bar 16.00 

Fanning mills 40.00 



TITLES 



PRICES OF LUMBER 



Dimension per tnousand 

No. 2 boards, per thousand 

No. 3 boards, per thousand 

Clear XXX Cedar shingles, per thousand 



25.00 
20.00 
16.00 
3.75 



PRICES OF LIVE STOCK 



1,000 pound Horses, prairie raised, each 
1,500 pound Horses, prairie raised, each 



100.00 
175.00 



Mares 15 to 25 per cent, higher 



Good cows 

Hogs, Live weight, per lb. 



50.00 
...8c 



Sunny Southern Alberta Winter Wheat, Pulled October 8th, 1909 



21 



HOMESTEADS 

In the Lethbridge district there are some homesteads still 
available, they are 60 or 70 miles from the city and 30 or 40 miles from a 
railroad, but the building of projected railroads will bring muny of them 
nearer the rail in the next two or three years. 

A synopsis of the Canadian regulations regarding homesteads Is as 
follows: 

Any person who is the sole head of a family, or any' male over 18 years 
old, may hoitiestead a quarter-section of available Dominion iand In Manitoba, 
Saskatchewan or Alberta. The applicant must appear in person at the Domin- 
ion Lands Agency or Sub-Agency for the district. Entry by proxy may be 
made at any agency on certain conditions, by father, mother, son, daughter, 
brother or sisiter of intending homesteader. 

Duties — Six months' residence upon and cultivation of the land In each 
of three years. A homesteader may live within nine miles of his homestead 
on a farm of at leas-t 80 acres solely owned and occupied by him or by his 
father, mother, son, daughter, brother or sister. 

In certain districts a homesteader in good standing may pre-empt a quarter- 
section alongside his homestead. Price $3.00 per acre. Duties — Must reside 
six months in each of six years from date of homestead entry (including the 
one required to earn homestead patent) and cultivate fifty acres extra. 

A homesteader who has exhausted Ms homestead right and cannot ob- 
tain a pre-emption may take a purchased homestead in certain distnicts. Price 
$3.00 per acre. Duties — Must reside six months in each of three years, cul- 
tivate fifty acres and erect a house worth $300.00. 



CUSTOMS REGULATIONS FOR THE SETTLER 

The Customs tariff provides for the free entry of settlers effects as follows 
it being understood that "live stock for the farm" means not more than 16 head. 

Clause 705 — Wearing apparel, books, usual and reasonable household fur- 
niture and other household effects; instruments and tools of trade, occupation 
or employment, guns, musical instruments, domestic sewing machines, type- 
writers, bicycles, carts, wagons and other highway vehicles, agricultural imple- 
ments and live stock for the farm, not to include live stock or articles for sale, 
or for use as a contractors outfit, nor vehicles nor implements moved by mech- 
anical power, nor machinery for use in any manufacturing establishment; all 
the foregoing if actually owned abroad by the settler for at least six months 
before his removal to Canada and subject to the regulations prescribed by the 
Minister of Customs; Provided that any dutiable article entered as settlers 
effects may not be so entered unless brought by the settler on his first arrival 
and shall not be sold or otherwise disposed of without payment of duty until 
after twelve months actual use in Canada. 



1 -y 




23 



CITY OF LETHBRIDGE 

The City of Lethbridge is situated in the centre of Sunny Southern Alberta 
and is the metropolis of the district. 

By rail it is 993 miles or 30 hours run from Minneapolis, 763 miles from 
Winnipeg, 1,483 miles from Chicago, 1,590 miles from St. liOuis, 1,356 miles 
from Omaha, 1,553 miles from Kansas City. 

It is a modern progressive up-to-date City of 11,000 population. 

Has Municipal owned electric light and power plant, water and sewage 
system and up-to-date fire brigade and police department. 

Wide streets, good cement sidewalks, boulevards and trees. 

Churches, Schools, Dodges, Hospitals, Theaters, Business Houses, and 
Homes, such as are usually found in a modern city. 

$6<J,000 Y. M. C. A. building now being built. 

A Daily newspaper and a second just starting, 10 Banks representing a 
capital of over $86,000,000 and another now building. 
Building permits for 1909 $1,268,215. 
Pay Roll over $200,000 per month. 
5 large Coal Mines within 5 miles of the city. 
Flour Mills and Elevators. 

Has openings for all kinds of business and manufacturing. 
Increased its population 66 per cent last year. 
Is the coming City of Alberta. 

For further information regarding city or district write the Board of Trade 
Lethbridge, Alberta, 



INDEX 



Dry and Irrigated Farmdng 3 

The Grain Crop 3 

Preparation for First Cro^ 5 

Cost of First Crop 5 

Price of Grain 7 

Alfalfa 7 

Sugar Beets 7 

Small Fruits 9 

Market Gardens 11 

Kitchen Gardens 11 

Dairy Farming 11 

Poultry Farming 11 

Rainfall 13 

Weather 15 

Sunshine 15 

Map of District inside back cover 



Taxes 



15 



Roads and Bridges 15 

Schools 17 

Fuel 17 

Experimental Farm 17 

Law and Order 17 

Prices and Terms for Land 17 

Titles 19 

Prices of Implements 19 

Prices of Lumber 19 

Prices of Live Stock 19 

Homesteads 21 

Customs Regulations 21 

City of Lethbridge 23 



[A Stool of Sunny Southern A Iberia Oats